Teens prefer Snapchat, women gravitate to Pinterest and nearly everyone’s on Facebook. Social media is no longer a new phenomenon: it’s a way of life, one that’s been embraced by consumers from all age groups and demographic backgrounds. That’s why social media has become the domain of not just B2C businesses, but B2B businesses too. No matter your industry, the people you’re trying to reach are on Twitter and Instagram, so you have to be there too. Excelling at social media is one of the ways your brand sets itself apart from the competition.

Home in on the Right Sites

brb social mediaThe social media landscape is vast and ever-changing. The sites that are most popular with consumers aren’t necessarily the right sites for B2B marketing. Factors unique to your marketing needs will determine what sites make sense for you to focus on.

Industry comes into play here. A company that sells products to interior designers might benefit from maintaining an active Pinterest account, which might not be as useful for a tax firm. Where your audience is located matters, too. Facebook is a valuable tool for connecting with local businesses, but if you’re hoping to reach an international audience, the strategy might be a little different. Using Facebook won’t help you reach Chinese businesses, since the platform is banned there – WeChat is a hugely popular alternative. And LinkedIn continues to be a powerful resource for B2B marketing.

Identify Brands to Emulate

Because what appeals to decision makers in one industry won’t appeal to decision makers in another industry, there’s not just one way to use social media for B2B marketing. So it’s useful to look at what the social media leaders in your industry are doing, and why it’s working for them. For example, Novartis drives traffic to its Instagram channel not by posting dry or informative facts about pharmaceuticals, but by spotlighting individual employees and its own charitable endeavors.

It can be just as useful to study the ways in which brands less successfully use social media. Check out your competitors’ social media presences and take note of their follower counts and engagement metrics (how many comments/shares/likes posts regularly get). Identifying the things that the low performers have in common – do they post very infrequently, or routinely post typo-laden content? – should help you zero in on some things that you can do differently.

Create Must-See Content

Getting your target companies to land on your LinkedIn or Facebook pages is just one step. Getting them to stay and engage with you instead of scrolling past is a separate challenge. Again, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this – figuring out exactly what kind of content will appeal to your target audience depends on your business, their tastes and your marketing goals. Infusing posts with humor and using compelling visuals is almost always a good starting point. It’s a crowded field, and providing content that’s more interesting, useful or entertaining than your competitors’ is a way to stand out.

Engage, Engage, Engage

If you’re only using your social media channels to drop new posts, you’re missing out on valuable opportunities. Engaging with other companies on social media helps you build name recognition and a reputation for being dynamic and responsive. It also humanizes your brand and allows you to answer questions and identify new leads. Acknowledging and responding to every post might not be possible, depending on your resources, but it’s something to strive for. Creating a social media response policy is an important step in making sure that all company-posted responses are appropriate and on-brand, especially if multiple employees share this duty.

Measure Your Metrics

There are a lot of ways to measure social media metrics, like looking at engagement stats and tracking conversion rates. Your social media channels give you actionable data every single day. Even if the data you get is grim, it’s useful. For example, if you load five Facebook posts in one week and only one gets any engagement, that tells you something worked about that one post that didn’t work about any of the others. Maybe the others went up in the morning and the successful post went up near the end of the workday, suggesting that your target audience is most active on social media around that time.

Your social media presence is just one part of a complete marketing strategy, but it’s a critically important one. In the golden age of social media, underestimating its power and reach means leaving money on the table. If you would like to take your social media presence to the next level, I’d be happy to help. Reach out today and we can discuss the unique needs of your business.

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Alison has more than fifteen years of professional services marketing and business development experience. She is a Boston College Double Eagle, holding both a BS in Management with concentrations in Marketing & Information Systems, and an MBA. Alison is a member of the 2009 Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 class of honorees.